Performance Review in Purple Office

Dec 22, 2023

Strategies for Success: Transforming Performance Reviews into Growth Opportunities

Elevate your performance reviews with insights from top companies like Deloitte and Microsoft. We emphasize on clarity, empathy, and post-review strategies for effective employee engagement and development.

You're not alone if you feel like the performance reviews are just a huge pain in your...work. They often seem like a big waste of time, leaving people feeling down, confused, and even unfairly judged. Turns out, a lot of bosses and employees agree. According to a McKinsey survey, most CEOs think their company's review process isn't great at spotting the real stars. More than half of employees think their managers just don't get it right. Gallup's research is even more eye-opening – only 20% of the global talent feel their company's review methods motivate them.

A fresh take on performance reviews

Negative vibes create a feeling of uselessness. Managers end up doing, uninspiring reviews that are more about costs than real feedback. Employees caught on to this and started seeing these "appraisals" as meaningless. And so, the cycle continues, busy managers doing even more rushed reviews, and the whole process becomes a downer, dragging everyone's performance down.

Some companies like Deloitte and Microsoft have even ditched performance ratings completely. In that article, we are diving into how we can make performance reviews useful. We will share some top tips for managers on planning, conducting, and repeating these reviews in a way that boosts employee performance and makes these potentially tough conversations a bit easier. The goal of reviews should be to give a clear and helpful evaluation of how someone's doing and then help them grow in their job.
Research across various fields shows that people become top performers when they know specifically where they need to improve and get feedback while they work on those skills. And it's not just about work experience – life experiences like hobbies or family also play a big part in our professional growth, so keep those in mind when you’re speaking with the top talent, and polish your soft skills.
For the person giving the feedback, it's all about guiding their team to focus on the right things, understand their responsibilities, and become better leaders. The higher you go in any organization, the more you rely on your team's performance. This means managers need to be on point before, during, and after the review

Before the Review

Managers, you've got to be clear about what challenges your team has dealt with and how it ties into the bigger picture. Make time for these reviews – they're crucial for your team's growth and shouldn't be rushed. Pay attention to your team's behavior and help them understand how it affects others. It's important to figure out why someone might be struggling – is it a lack of motivation, or skills, or maybe they're just not in the right role? And don't forget to recognize your star players – what can you do to keep them engaged and learning?

During the Review:

Here's a five-step guide for a solid review chat:

● Show you are here for them:

○ Begin the conversation by expressing your support and willingness to listen.

○ Use empathetic language to convey that you value their contributions and want to work together for improvement.

○ Establish a positive and open atmosphere to encourage effective communication.

● Be specific about what you've noticed, use the sandwich method:

○ Provide specific examples of both positive and negative observations. This ensures clarity and helps the individual understand the context of your feedback.

○ Use the sandwich method, where you start with positive feedback, address areas that need improvement, and then end with positive reinforcement. This maintains a balanced and constructive tone.

● Explain how their actions impact the team and goals and start building from that:

○ Connect their behavior or performance to the overall team dynamics and organizational goals.

○ Help them understand the broader implications of their actions, whether positive or negative, on team collaboration, morale, and achievement of objectives.

● Encourage a two-way conversation, not a monologue:

○ Foster open communication by asking for their perspective on the feedback provided.

○ Actively listen to their thoughts, concerns, and ideas. This promotes a collaborative discussion and culture.

○ Ask open-ended questions to encourage them to share their insights and feelings about the feedback.

● Discuss next steps and how you both can take responsibility for them:

○ Collaboratively identify specific actions or strategies for improvement based on the feedback.

○ Establish a clear plan with measurable goals and milestones.

○ Emphasize that both parties share responsibility for the next steps and commit to working together to achieve positive outcomes.

By following these steps, you create a framework for a constructive and productive review chat that fosters mutual understanding and growth.

After the Review:

What happens after the review is key. Set goals and keep giving feedback. Use technology to your advantage for regular check-ins.
For instance, PerformYard, ClickUp, and Workhuman could help with that. Look for patterns in your team's performance and think about how you can use these insights to align better with your company's goals.

Final Thought

Remember, people often leave because of their managers, not the company. Many successful people can point to a manager who gave them meaningful feedback. As a manager, it's your job to show that you care and can be trusted with assessing the performance. Let's make these reviews something to look forward to, not dread!

You're not alone if you feel like the performance reviews are just a huge pain in your...work. They often seem like a big waste of time, leaving people feeling down, confused, and even unfairly judged. Turns out, a lot of bosses and employees agree. According to a McKinsey survey, most CEOs think their company's review process isn't great at spotting the real stars. More than half of employees think their managers just don't get it right. Gallup's research is even more eye-opening – only 20% of the global talent feel their company's review methods motivate them.

A fresh take on performance reviews

Negative vibes create a feeling of uselessness. Managers end up doing, uninspiring reviews that are more about costs than real feedback. Employees caught on to this and started seeing these "appraisals" as meaningless. And so, the cycle continues, busy managers doing even more rushed reviews, and the whole process becomes a downer, dragging everyone's performance down.

Some companies like Deloitte and Microsoft have even ditched performance ratings completely. In that article, we are diving into how we can make performance reviews useful. We will share some top tips for managers on planning, conducting, and repeating these reviews in a way that boosts employee performance and makes these potentially tough conversations a bit easier. The goal of reviews should be to give a clear and helpful evaluation of how someone's doing and then help them grow in their job.
Research across various fields shows that people become top performers when they know specifically where they need to improve and get feedback while they work on those skills. And it's not just about work experience – life experiences like hobbies or family also play a big part in our professional growth, so keep those in mind when you’re speaking with the top talent, and polish your soft skills.
For the person giving the feedback, it's all about guiding their team to focus on the right things, understand their responsibilities, and become better leaders. The higher you go in any organization, the more you rely on your team's performance. This means managers need to be on point before, during, and after the review

Before the Review

Managers, you've got to be clear about what challenges your team has dealt with and how it ties into the bigger picture. Make time for these reviews – they're crucial for your team's growth and shouldn't be rushed. Pay attention to your team's behavior and help them understand how it affects others. It's important to figure out why someone might be struggling – is it a lack of motivation, or skills, or maybe they're just not in the right role? And don't forget to recognize your star players – what can you do to keep them engaged and learning?

During the Review:

Here's a five-step guide for a solid review chat:

● Show you are here for them:

○ Begin the conversation by expressing your support and willingness to listen.

○ Use empathetic language to convey that you value their contributions and want to work together for improvement.

○ Establish a positive and open atmosphere to encourage effective communication.

● Be specific about what you've noticed, use the sandwich method:

○ Provide specific examples of both positive and negative observations. This ensures clarity and helps the individual understand the context of your feedback.

○ Use the sandwich method, where you start with positive feedback, address areas that need improvement, and then end with positive reinforcement. This maintains a balanced and constructive tone.

● Explain how their actions impact the team and goals and start building from that:

○ Connect their behavior or performance to the overall team dynamics and organizational goals.

○ Help them understand the broader implications of their actions, whether positive or negative, on team collaboration, morale, and achievement of objectives.

● Encourage a two-way conversation, not a monologue:

○ Foster open communication by asking for their perspective on the feedback provided.

○ Actively listen to their thoughts, concerns, and ideas. This promotes a collaborative discussion and culture.

○ Ask open-ended questions to encourage them to share their insights and feelings about the feedback.

● Discuss next steps and how you both can take responsibility for them:

○ Collaboratively identify specific actions or strategies for improvement based on the feedback.

○ Establish a clear plan with measurable goals and milestones.

○ Emphasize that both parties share responsibility for the next steps and commit to working together to achieve positive outcomes.

By following these steps, you create a framework for a constructive and productive review chat that fosters mutual understanding and growth.

After the Review:

What happens after the review is key. Set goals and keep giving feedback. Use technology to your advantage for regular check-ins.
For instance, PerformYard, ClickUp, and Workhuman could help with that. Look for patterns in your team's performance and think about how you can use these insights to align better with your company's goals.

Final Thought

Remember, people often leave because of their managers, not the company. Many successful people can point to a manager who gave them meaningful feedback. As a manager, it's your job to show that you care and can be trusted with assessing the performance. Let's make these reviews something to look forward to, not dread!

Author

Diana Onishchenko

Diana Onishchenko

Diana traded her dancing shoes for a brand new laptop. She moved from entertaining people to helping them get jobs they love and are passionate about.

She’s a team lead for 2 years, fully remote, advocating for the underdog; you can find her either at a conference or next to the beach. She was probably a duck in a different life.

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